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‘Together we learn, believe and achieve’
Here is where you will find the answers to the Maths as well as any other answers for your work. I will also include feedback where you have been in touch. This could be something lots of people have found a challenge (and therefore useful advice for the future). I will also share examples of your work here - so please send me some examples of your school work so that I can feature it!

More brilliant joiners in the style of David Hockney

Excellent reflecting on home learning today

Maths answers for Thursday 21st May

 

 

2a) You will have different answers for this one.

 b) It is possible if you plot T at (-5, 1)

 

Workbook:

 

 

c) JKLM is a parallelogram

d) PQRS is a trapezium

 

2) The coordinates of point Z are (-5, 3)

I have had even more of your wonderful joiners sent to me today. Look out for them in the newsletter later today. 

Meanwhile, Kiana's writing of Wonder is just wonderful!

Maths answers for Wednesday 20th May

Let’s Learn:

  1. B is at (4,6)

E is at (5,1)

 

  1. C is at (-2, -3)

 

  1. A is at (-3, 3)

B is at (2, 3)

D is at (-2, -3)

 

Guided Practice:

1a) J = (-5, 2)

 b) A = (0,-5)

 c) C = (5, -5)

 d) K = (0, 5)

 

2 – You might have a number of answers for this one.

 

Workbook:

 

1ai) (-4, 4)

   ii) (-4, -2)

  iii) (6, -6)

  iv) (2,4)

 

 b) (2, -2)

 

 c) Any of these: (-4, -6), (6, -2) (3, 1)

 

d) Trapezium

 

Maths answers for Tuesday 19th May

Guided Practice:

 

Workbook:

We have some Hockney-inspired artists in the making!

Austin's joiner

It was good to receive some pictures of your work from last week - keep them coming!

Maths answers for Monday 18th May

 

Guided Practice:

1a) -1m

  b) 7m

 

2a) -7

 b) -2

 c) 2

 d) 8

 

3)

 

 

Workbook:

 

 

 

3a) A: -6

      B: -2

      C:3

  b) (i) 4

      (ii) 9

Maths answers for Friday 15th May

Workbook Chapter Review:

1) a+b = 90

     d + c = 180

     b + c = 180

therefore 180 ÷ 5 = 36

     a = 54˚

     b = 36˚

     c = 144 ˚

     d = 36 ˚

 

2) 180 – 90 = 90

    90 ÷ 3 = 30

    e = 30 ˚

    f = 60 ˚

   g = 90 ˚

 

3) 180 -36 = 144

    144 ÷ 2 = 72

    Angle JKL = 72 ˚

 

4) 360 -112- 76 = 172

    172 ÷ 5 = 34.4

    Angle MPO = 34.4 ˚

    Angle MNO = 137.6 ˚

 

5) 720 + 360 = 1080 ˚

 

6) y = 53 ˚

    z = 53 ˚

   180 – (53+53) = 74 ˚

   180 – 74 = 106 ˚

 

 

7)

8) 

Maths answers for Wednesday 13th May

Let’s Learn

Q1) The square-based pyramid has 4 triangle faces and 1 square face.

 

Guided Practice:

1a) The flat face of a cone is a circle shape.

b) When cut open and laid flat, the curved surface becomes a circle with a sector removed.

 

 

Workbook:

Q1a)

b) The square based pyramids have different heights and volumes.

Maths answers for Tuesday 12th May

Let’s Learn:

Q1) A triangular prism has 2 triangle faces and 3 rectangle faces.

 

Guided Practice:

1a) The flat faces are a circle shape.

 b) The curved face, when laid flat, is a rectangle shape.

2) Answers will vary.

 

Workbook:

 

Q2a) A pentagonal prism has 7 flat faces.

    b) The faces are 2 pentagons and 5 rectangles.

    c) Answers will vary.

 

I have enjoyed receiving the examples of your news reports today. I'm sorry, I think I confused some of you by calling it a newsletter instead of a news report. Arthur has jumped ahead to what I wanted you to do tomorrow by laying his out more formally. This means he can now focus on his editing.

 

 

RE

The RE has really got you thinking today too! Charlotte and Patrick have both chosen different paths to think about. You might have considered a different one again. Is there anything else you think could be a path to enlightenment?

It is important to have a break between lessons - why not do some doodling like Lucas?

Maths answers for Monday 11th May

 

Guided Practice:

1a) The ratio of a:b = 1:2

 b) The ratio of x:y = 5:1

 

2a) PQ = 27 ÷ 3

           = 9cm

      AC = 3 x 3

           = 9cm

 

Workbook:

1a) The ratio of a:b = 1:1.5

 b) The ratio of c:d = 1:4

 

2a) The ratio is 1:2

     So if we have x:6, we have multipled 2 x 3 to make 6 so we must multiply 1 x 3

     X = 3cm

b) The ratio is 3:1

    5 x 3 = 15

    Y = 15cm

Music – raps about you!

Arthur sent me a brilliant audio clip of him performing his rap. Unfortunately I can’t upload that (you’ll have to ask him for a performance on the next class Zoom) but here is a transcription of his brilliant lyrics!

 

Hello, good day, my name is Arthur

I’ve come to get down and hit you with some laughter

If you don’t like my rhymes then that’s a disaster

Sorry I can’t say this a little faster

I like to play my PS4

Put on my headphones and shut the door,

In my own little world, I drift away

I could sit here and play this game all day.

What’s that noise?

It’s my dad

He’s feeling a little sad

He wants me to go outside a little more,

See the world and explore.

Gonna go now to keep him sweet

With the hope that we might meet.

 

I’d love to hear some more if you would like to record your raps and send them over. Alternatively, type up the lyrics and I will upload those too.

Please send me pictures of how you chose to recognise VE day so that I can pass these on to Mrs McLean. 

 

Maths answers for Thursday 7th May

Guided Practice:

  1. Length AC and BC = 2.6cm each.

DF and EF = 3.5cm

GI and HI = 5cm

 

  1. Angle ACB = 140°

DFE = 90°

GIH = 60°

 

  1. As the size of the angles increase, so do the lengths of the sides.

 

Workbook:

Your triangle should look something like this:

 

 

1ai) Length AC = 9cm

   ii) BC = 7cm

 

b) Angle ACB = 80°

c) This is an isosceles triangle.

 

2) Your triangles should look something like:

 

2ai) The perimeter of triangle DEF = 6 + 4 + 4 = 14cm

  ii) The perimeter of triangle GHI = 4.1 + 5.9 + 8 = 18cm

 

bi) Angle FDE = 100°

 ii) GIH = 105°

 

  1. Area of triangle DEF

      4 x 8 = 32

               32 ÷2

 = 16cm²

I haven't had anyone send me any work today! Please try to do this at least once in the week so that a) I can see what you are doing and how you are getting on and b) so that we can share your great learning with each other. 

 

 

Maths answers for Wednesday 6th May

Guided Practice:

1) QR = 10cm

      Perimeter = 6+8+10

                     = 24cm

      Angle PQR = 53°

      Angle PRQ = 37°

 

2) The shape is a rhombus.

The size of your angles will vary but your opposite angles should be equal and all

angles should equal 360°

 

Workbook:

  1. You should have drawn this shape (the size of angles will vary)

 

 

  1. Your rectangle could have sides of 2cm and 4cm or 1cm and 5cm.

Your square should have sides of 3cm.

 

Answers for Q3 and 4 will vary.

Maths answers for Tuesday 5th May

Guided Practice:

1a) Angles in a circle = 360°

      360 – 90 = 270

      270 ÷ 2 = 135°

  b) Angles in a circle = 360°

      360 – 90 = 270

      The ratio is 5:4 meaning there are 9 equal parts.

      270 ÷ 9 = 30

      a = 5 parts

      30 x 5 = 150°

2a) Angles in a triangle = 180°

      180 – 30 = 150°

      As the triangle is an isosceles, the other 2 angles will be equal.

      150 ÷ 2 = 75°

  b) Triangle OAB is an isosceles triangle meaning that angle OAB = ABO

      To find angle AOB we need to do:

      30 x 2 = 60

      180 – 60 = 120°

   c) Start by finding AOB by using the formula for angles on a straight line (= 180°)

      180 – 30 = 150

      Angle AOB = 150°

      The triangle is an isosceles so we can do the following:

      180 – 150 = 30°

       30 ÷ 2 = 15°

 

Workbook:

1a) 180 – 66 = 114

      114 ÷ 2 =  57°

  b) 61 x 2 = 122

      180 – 122 = 58°

  c) d = the unmarked angle meaning that the ratio of the three angles is 2:3:3, giving us 8 equal parts.

      180 ÷ 8 – 22.5

      c = 2 parts

            22.5 x 2 = 45°

     d = 3 parts

            22.5 x 3 = 67.5°

2) Angles in a circle = 360°

    360 – 108 = 252°

    The ratio is 3:4 giving 7 equal parts.

    252 ÷ 7 = 36

    Angle e = 3 equal parts

                   36 x 3

                  108°

   Angle f = 4 equal parts

                 36 x 4

                 144°

3) Angle JOL is 106°. Using the formula for angles on a straight line we can find angle KOL: 180 – 106 = 74°

    We can find the other 2 angles in the triangle by using formula for angles in a    triangle = 180°

    180 – 74 = 106°

    106 ÷ 2 = 53°

  Angle OLK = 53°

 

4) p + q = 360°

    The ratio of q to p = 2:7 meaning that there are 9 equal parts.

    360 ÷ 9 = 40

    Angle q = 2 parts

                = 40 x 2

                = 80°

   Angle p = 7 parts

               = 40 x 7

               = 280°

    To find angle r = 180 – q

                          = 180 – 80

                          = 100

         100 ÷ 2 = 50°

 

English

You seem to have enjoyed having the option of how to show your understanding of Via's feelings today. I have received some brilliant writing which really showcases her emotions and also considers the language that Via would use. 

 

Dear Diary,

I have just finished dinner with mum and Auggie, and I made him mad.
It was completely my fault; I told mum that I didn't want Auggie coming to my school play, and then mum told Auggie that it was a play that he would not be interested in, but, he realized what was going on and he got mad and went to his room for half an hour.

I like how it is in school now: no one knows about Auggie, I'm not the 'sister of a freak' anymore. I'm Olivia Pallman, a nice girl, with lots of friends! I don't want Auggie to stop that, I know I shouldn't, but we all deserve to be human, right?
Anyway, while Auggie was having a strop in his room, mum started to tell me that she thought it would be fine if Auggie came to watch the play. And - as you can imagine - I got mad at her, I probably went a bit overboard with the shouting, but I was mad... really mad.
After that I just gave up telling her about it and so I went to my room to calm down. About an hour later, mum came in and asked me what she could do to help. I said that I just wanted to be a normal girl, not the 'sister of a freak' , I wanted to have freedom and enjoy high school while I can. I said to her that I do love Auggie so much, but I just want to have one day as a normal girl, one day!

But that's not possible.
 

 

Hey,

 

Sorry about what I did today and yesterday. You know I love you right and I hope you love me to.

 

So, you know that at my old school everybody was ok with me, let’s just say they are not “acting normally” around me and I was not so keen on that, and you know that everyone at my new school does not know about you. Its normal and I like it that way so if it is ok with you, I will not tell anyone at my new school about you. Also, I will tell Justin that I am keeping it a secret so not to tell anyone.

 

The next thing is about the play, as you already know that I don’t want anybody knowing that you are my bro. So, it is obvious that I don’t want you to come to the play. So, I will ask mum or dad if they don’t mind one of them staying home with you, or if you are feeling all grown up you could maybe stay home!!

 

Hope you understand.

Love you lots,

Via

Maths answers for Monday 4th May

Let’s Learn Q2:

r (radius)

circumference ©

1cm

6.28cm

2cm

12.57cm

3cm

18.85cm

You will notice that the circumference increases by roughly 6.285cm with each cm increase of the radius.

 

Guided Practice:

1a) r= 4cm

      d = 8cm

 b) r = 2.5cm

     d = 5cm

 c) r = 2.7cm

    d = 5.4cm

2a) d = 6cm

      r = 3cm

  b) d = 5.25cm

      r = 2.675cm (or 2 and 5 eighths)

  c) d = 6.2cm

      r = 3.1cm

 

Workbook:

1a) Radius = 3cm

      Diameter = 6cm

  b) Radius = 1.5cm

      Diameter = 3cm

  c) Radius = 2.5cm

      Diameter = 5cm

2a) radius = 4÷2

              = 2cm

  b) radius = 7÷2

              = 3.5cm

3a) diameter = 1.5 x 2

                    = 3cm

      diameter = 3.9 x 2

                    = 7.8cm

 

Here is a great example of how this work might look in your book:

English

I have received some brilliant poems today, exploring what it would be like to regain a sense (like August with his hearing). I think we possibly found it a bit challenging to come up with metaphorical phrases to include. Perhaps you have a good suggestion?

 

 

Brightly Hearing

By Seth Williams

 

Hearing for the first time: it was AMAZING

It was something very different, I have not heard anything like it 

But there was one problem…

 

What would Jack and Summer say?

They’d look at and say nothing and say “that’s cool Auggie”

but I forgot about somebody much, much bigger…

JULIAN

I like Grace and Archie's original choices for their animals in Science this week. They have chosen animals that are incredibly well adapted to their environments.

Why is adaptation so important?

Maths answers for Friday 1st May

Guided Practice:

1) Angles in a quadrilateral add up to 360°

2) The shape is made up of 2 triangles. Angles in a triangle equal 180°.

    Therefore 2 x 180 = 360°

3)The angles in each triangle equal 180°.

    4 triangles = 180 x 4

                    = 720°

    There are 4 right angles in the corners of the square .

     4 x 90 = 360°

     Add the 4 right angles to the 4 triangles.

     720 + 360 = 1080°

 

Workbook:

  1. In an equilateral triangle all angles = 60°

So a+b+c+d = 4 x 60

= 240°

 

  1. Angles in a triangle = 180°

Angles in a quadrilateral = 360°

Add all of the angles together: 180 + 360

= 540°

 

  1. An octagon is made up of 8 triangles.

8 x 180 = 1440

You then have to subtract the 360° to allow for the circle in the middle.

1440 – 360 = 1080.

Divide 1080 by 8 = 135°

Each angle around the outside = 135°

 

The triangle that is labelled is an isosceles triangle.

To find angle AHB we need to do:

180 – 135 = 45

That gives you the 2 smaller angles in the triangle.

To find angle AHB we divide 45 by 2.

Final answer: 22.5°

Thank you to the keyworkers! (PSHE work for today)

The Debate rages on! You can read other viewpoints on our debate page (scroll down for the link)

 

Here is Elsie's argument:

 

This argument is about this statement in Wonder: 'The Universe takes care of it's most fragile creatures'. I think that the definition of 'Universe' here is all the stars, planets, people, animals, black holes, asteroids in space (and the Earth too!). I strongly disagree with this statement, because the smallest of things in space or on Earth, are meant to be caring for it's most fragile creatures, so a star millions upon millions of miles away has nothing to do with anyone's life. Therefore not all of the Universe is taking care of all its fragile creations.

People that are lucky like you and me are looked after, but people, for example, like kids in a war, are not lucky because they have to flee their homes to find a safe place (probably only to stay until they are kicked out). Not being looked after - right?
Things like natural disasters, like viruses, floods, storms and earthquakes, are the Universe's creation. That -I am pretty sure- is not how you take care for people! The Universe is creating these disasters, and then throwing them at the weak and vulnerable.

In conclusion, I think that this statement is wrong. I do not agree with the fact that the Universe does take care of its fragile creations. I have said many reasons on my side to disagree, but I do I understand that there are many ways of using the word 'Universe', especially in this situation. It could mean many different things, and that each definition changes their opinion. But, my view is that I strongly disagree.


 

PE - It's Fancy Dress Friday!

Maths Answers for Thursday 30th April

Guided practice:

1a) Angles in a quadrilateral = 360°

     360 – (2 x 60) = 240

     240 ÷ 2 = 120

     X = 120°

 

b) 80 + 120 + 90 + y = 360

    360 – (80 + 120 + 90) = y

    360 – (290) = y

    70° = y

 

c) 100 x 3 = 300

    360 – 300

   AME = 60°

 

Workbook:

1a) In a parallelogram, opposite angles are equal, so q = 47°

     47 + p = 180°

     180 – 47 = 133

     P = 133°

b) 360 – (84 + 133 + 72) = r

   r = 71°

c) 39 + s = 180

    180 – 39 = 141

   S = 141°

 

2) 360 – (90 + 133 + 28) = ABC

    ABC = 109°

 

3) 360 – (81 + 107 + 52) = EFG

   EFG = 120°

 

4) 360 – (80 x 2) = KLM + LMN

    200 = KLM + LMN

   KLM/LMN = 200÷2

                 = 100

The class debate has begun! Email me your thoughts to add and I will upload them. You can go to the debate page by clicking the link below. 

Answers to Maths for Wednesday 29th April

Guided Practice:

1) As triangle ABC is an equilateral triangle, all angles must be the same size.

    Angles in a triangle = 180°

    180 ÷ 3 = 60

    Angle ABC = 60°

2) An isosceles triangle is one with 2 equal angles (and 2 equal sides)

    D and E are equal.

    180 – 80 = D + E

    100 = D + E

    100 ÷ 2 = D/E

    D and E = 50° each.

3) G = 90°, H = 35°, I = ?

    90 + 35 + I = 180

    180 – 90 – 35 = I

     I = 55°

4) L = 180 – 95 – 30

    L = 55°

 

Workbook:

1a) 180 – (58 x 2)

      180 – 116

      x = 64°

  b) x = 180 – 32 – 105

      x = 43°

  c) x = 180 – (90+36)

      x = 180 – 126

      x = 54°

 

2) ABC = 180 – 44 – 63

           = 73°

3) DFE = 180 – 90 – 41

           = 49°

4) Angle H = Angle I

    H = 49°

    G = 180 – (49 x 2)

       = 180 – 98

       = 82°

You've been showing a great understanding of coasts in your topic work.

Tuesday 28th April

I am so pleased to hear that you have found the Youtube videos useful today. I haven't planned to use any for the rest of this week (and currently I don't think we'll need them for our lessons next week) but if you are finding something tricky, let me know and I am happy to add a video where it will help. 

I have loved reading your poems today - you really got the idea of the poem and I didn't have any poems about the same person which is amazing!

 

Here are some of the poems from today:

Mrs Newton 28 April 1686

 

Sat under a tree,

I said to Him,

Why do these apples fall to the ground,

What could it be?

By Patrick

 

My poem about Christopher Columbus:

Went for a sail,
Said to my crew -
'We'll find riches of silver and gold,
More then we can carry, off the scale!!'

Went for a stroll,
Said to my crew -
'Take all the valuables you see! Don't stop!
We're on a roll!'

Left my crew,
Said to the rest -
'Don't worry about them,
Just beat them black and blue!'

Went back to the Palace,
Said to my crew -
'Give our Queen the riches, jewels
And necklaces!'

Went down on my knees,
Said to my crew -
'Don't give up... we can get more gold,
If we travel the high seas!'

Went back to the New Land,
Said to my crew -
'These people are stupid! We're in charge!
And they're fighting us... this isn't planned.'

Went off to fight,
Said to my crew -
'Don't stop for a breath, we need to win!
Carry on all night!'

Went off to jail,
Said to my crew -
'Stay strong and bold! Remember everything I have told you:
'Always fight tooth and nail''

Went to the throne room,
The Queen said to me -
'You can have one last voyage, but you are
Forbidden to return to Espanol, or you will meet your doom!'

Went on my last outing,
Said to myself -
'I love to explore, I love to discover...
One day it will be name they will shout!!'

Went to my death bed,
Said to myself -
''It will be my name
That they will shout!!'

by Elsie

 

Joan Clarke 

9th July 1941

(Engaged to Alan Turing)

 

Went to the Computer Shop.

I said to Him-

I don't understand code-breaking,

I think I just might pop!​

by Grace

 

Shirley Jennifer Serrano Rojas

 

Went on an expedition to Peru

I said to her-

You hear the croaking,           

That reminds me of you.

                                                                                

Went on an expedition to Peru

I said to her-

You see on that leaf,

That reminds me of you.

 

Went on an expedition to Peru

I said to her-

You see all those bright colours,

That reminds me of you.

 

By: Archie

Answers for Maths 28th April

I have gone into quite a lot of detail here to guide you if you found it tricky. 

Guided Practice:

1a) If the ratio of angle x to angle y is 2:3, that means we have 5 equal parts altogether.

     180 ÷ 5 = 36

     Angle x is the 2 parts.

     2 x 36 = 72

     Angle x = 72°

  b) Angle m is the same as angle y.

 

2a) If a = x, then to find b we would have to do 90 – x

  b) If c = x, then to find d would have to find out what c+d equals first then subtract d.

     c + d must equal 270° because a+b = 90°

     (360 – 90 = 270)

      Therefore, to find d, you would have to do 270 – x

  c) You cannot calculate a and b from the information given.

      You can find c and d.

     We know that c + d = 270 and that the ratio of c:d = 4:5

     We have 9 equal parts so we need to divide 270 by 9

      270 ÷ 9 = 30

      c = 4 x 30

         = 120°

      d = 5 x 30

         = 150°

 

Workbook:

  1. a + b = 180

Ratio of a:b = 2:1 – we have 3 equal parts.

180 ÷ 3 = 60

a = 2 x 60

   = 120°

b = 60°

 

Angle c is opposite angle a so c = a

Angle c = 120°

 

  1. The unlettered angle is a right angle meaning that d + e + f = 360 – 90

                                                                                      = 270°

Angle e is a right angle (because it is on a straight line with the marked right angle 180-90 = 90°­)

 

The ratio of d to e is 3:5

If e = 90° then to find 1 part we need to divide 90 by 5

90÷ 5 = 18

Angle d is 3 equal parts

d = 18 x 3

   = 54°

 

We can find angle f by adding all of our other angles together and subtracting this from 360°:

90° + d (54) + e (90) = 234

360 – 234 = f

f = 126°

3) I would start by finding g and h.

    g + h = a straight line

              = 180°

 

   We know that the ratio of g:h is 2:7, giving us 9 equal parts.

   180 ÷ 9 = 20 (one equal part)

   g = 2 parts = 20 x 2

      = 40°

 

  h = 7 parts = 20 x 7

     = 140°

 

 j is an opposite angle to g meaning that j = g

 j = 40°

 

To find k, use one of the straight lines:

              g (or j)+ 90° + k = 180

              40 + 90 + k = 180

              130 + k = 180

              180 – 130 = 50°

              k = 50°

4) n is a right angle (90°) because it is on a straight line with the marked right angle.

    The ratio of n to m is 6:5.

    6 parts = 90

    1 part = 90 ÷ 6

              = 15°

    m = 5 parts

       = 15 x 5

       = 75°

 

    l + m = 90°

    l + 75 = 90

    90 – 75 = l

    l = 15°

 

5) p + q + r = a straight line = 180°

   The ratio is 5:3:1 which gives 9 equal parts.

   180 ÷ 9 = 20

 p = 5 parts

   = 20 x 5

   = 100°

q = 3 parts

   = 20 x 3

   = 60°

r = 1 part

   = 20°

Maths Answers for Monday 27th April

Guided Practice:

1a) Angle x = 180 – 29 = 151°

  b) Angle Y is opposite to angle x.

        X = y

        Angle Y = 151°

2a) Angle m = 360 – 120 – 90

                  = 150°

  b) Angle n =

      We know that n + ___ = 90°

      We can find the missing angle by using the straight line.

      ___ + 120 = 180° so 180 – 120 = 60°

      n + ___ = 90°

      n + 60 = 90 so 90 – 60 = n

     n = 30°

 

Workbook p101-102:

1a) a = c

     b = d

  b) p = r

      s = q

2a) I would start by finding angle b (as this is the opposite angle to the one we have been given.

     b = 110°

     a and c are opposite so will be equal. To find the size of a, use the straight line it is on with angle b.

    So to find a we know that a + b = 180

                                         a + 110 = 180

                                   so   180 – 110 = a

                                         70° = a

 If a = 70° then c also = 70°

 

 b) First find angle d using the straight line formula with the 105° angle.

    D + 105 = 180°

    180 – 105 = d

    75° = d

 

   The find e using the straight line formula:

   d + e  + 50° = 180°

  75 + e + 50 = 180

  e + 125 = 180

  180 – 125 = e

  e = 55°

 

2c) I would start by finding g as this is opposite to a given angle.

     g = 38°

 

     f + g make a straight line (180°)

     f + 38 = 180

     180 – 38 = f

     142° = f

  

     g + h make a right angle.

     g + h = 90°

     38 + h = 90

     90 – 38 = h

     52° = h

Thank you to the children who sent me their brilliant family trees that they completed for Science. I won't share these ones on the website because they include a lot of personal information about you!

Personal information like that in your family trees is a common choice when creating passwords. 

Why do we need to think carefully about what we put on the internet about ourselves?

How might someone else use that information?

How might we make our password choices more secure?

 

Maths feedback for Friday 24th April

The Maths activity for today proved rather popular! This was an activity with real scope for pushing yourself to think back over what you can remember (we did quite a lot of work on angles, triangles and quadrilaterals last year). Some people have used the computer to produce a brilliantly presented poster - the more attractive they look the more likely we are to look at them when we revise whilst others have so much detail on it - excellent use of diagrams too. 

PSHE from Friday 24th April

Hopefully you have had a go at creating a normality jar if you didn't have one already. Here is Jessica's.

Maths Answers for Thursday 23rd April

Workbook review:

1a) 4 x 7 x 9 = 252cm³

 b) 8 x 8 x 8 = 512mm³

 c) 10 x 5 x 0.5 = 25m³

 d) 3.2 x 5 x 16 = 256m³

 

2) 1m = 100cm

    100 ÷ 8 = 12.5

    12 x 12 x 12 = 1728 smaller cubes

 

3) 36 ÷ 3 = 12

    20 ÷ 3 = 6.67

    50 ÷ 3 = 16.67

    12 x 6 x 16 = 1152 cubes.

 

Mind workout TB p117

a) Two layers of 5cm high cubes will fit in the box. Each layer can fit 3 x 2 = cubes.

2 x 6 = 12 cubes.

b) Three layers of 3cm high cubes will fit in the box. Each layer can fit 5 x 4 = 20 cubes.

3 x 20 = 60 cubes.

c) Five layers of 2cm high cubes will fit in the box. Each layer can fit 7 x 6 = 42 cubes.

5 x 42 = 210 cubes.

d) One layer of 10cm high cubes will fit in the box. Each layer can fit 1 x 1 = 1 cube.

So 1 cube will fit in the large box.

 

Mind workout WBp98

The problem states that each cube has a different size and that all the sides are whole numbers, so the smallest cube will have a side length of 1cm as this is the smallest possible whole number. Therefore, the volume of the original cube would be made from a cube with 1cm sides, a cube with 2cm sides and a cube with 3cm sides.

The volume of the original cube is:

 1 x 1 x 1 + 2 x 2 x 2 + 3 x 3 x 3

= 1cm³ + 8cm³ + 27cm³

= 36cm³

The excellent presentation continues!

Computing

I am so pleased that the Race Across the World Challenge has got you all interested and engaged. Have a look at Freddie's brilliant write up for his first leg. He has a perfect balance of information and sightseeing suggestions. 

Maths answers for 22nd April

Guided practice:

Q1) 20 x 15 x 30 = 9000cm³ (this is the volume of the tank)

      9000 ÷ 420cm³ = 21.4

      21 bottles can be filled.

Q2) You can measure three 4cm lengths from each side of the large cube with 3cm left over.

      3 x 3 x 3 = 27

      You can cut 27 smaller cubes from the large cube.

Q3) First we can find the size of the metal cube in cm³

      There are 100cm in 1m so to find the volume of the metal cube in cm³ we need to:

      100 x 100 x 100 = 1 000 000cm³

     

      The volume of the cuboid is 20 x 10 x 30 = 6000cm³

 

So we can share the volume of the metal cube into the smaller cuboids to find out answer:

      1 000 000 ÷ 6000 = 166.66666667

 

     It is not possible to make 167 cubes because the volume of the metal cube is only enough to             make 166 complete cubes.

 

Workbook answers:

1a) 25 x 40 x 50 = 50 000cm³

     50 000 ÷ 8 = 6250

     6250 cubes can be made.

 

2) 45 x 30 x 120 = 162 000cm³

    162 000 ÷ 750 = 216

    216 bottles can be filled.

 

3) First we have to round each side down to the nearest multiple of 5 which gives us the dimensions: 45 x 25 x 90

   Our cubes will all need to have lengths of 5cm. So if we divide each dimension by 5, this will tell us the number of lengths of 5 we can make from each dimension:

             45 x 25 x 90 divided by 5 gives us 9 x 5 x 18

   If we multiply these together, this will tell us how many cubes we can make:

            9 x 5 x 18 = 810 cubes.

 

 4) Volume of the tank: 25 x 25 x 25 = 15 625cm³

     15 625 ÷ 2500 = 6.25 or 6 and a quarter buckets.

Well done to those of you who are managing to keep active - and get the rest of your family involved too! If you have been doing Joe Wicks for a while now, are you noticing a change in your fitness levels? Don't forget that Mrs Roll has a new personal best challenge to have a go at too. 

Topic Definitions

Here are the definitions for each of your coastal words. Your definitions might not be exactly the same but they should have the same meaning.

 

Bay – A natural, smoothly-curved inlet in the coast. Bays are formed in softer rocks and our bounded by headlands. Many bays have wide, sandy beaches.

 

Beach – a thin sheet or sand or shingle that lies between the high and low-tide parts of a coast.

 

Cliff – A steep slope at the coast, often with a face of bare rock.

 

Cove – a very small bay

 

Delta – The fan-shaped area of land that builds up where a river enters the sea and the sand and silt it is carrying settles out. The Mississippi delta is an example of a large delta.

 

Estuary – A drowned valley in a low lying coast. Estuaries were formed during the Ice Age when sea levels fell and rivers cut into their beds. At the end of the Ice Age the sea levels rose again and flooded the ends of the deepened valleys. The estuaries of the Thames, Wye, Severn and Humber are all examples of drowned valleys.

 

Headland – The parts of the coast that stands out into the sea. Most headlands are formed in hard rock.

 

Tides – The change in the level of the sea during the day. This is caused by the gravitational pull of the moon.

Maths answers for Tuesday 21st March

Guided practice:

1) 8 x 8 x 8 = 512mm³

2a) 8 x 5 x 3 = 120mm³

  b) 10 x 8 x 15 = 1200mm³

3a) The lengths of the boxes increase by 3 each time. To find the lengths of the smallest box I need to -3 from the lengths of the green box.

     6 – 3 = 3

     3 x 3 x 3 = 27 mm³

b) In the same way, the largest box needs to have lengths that are +3mm compared to the blue box.

   12 + 3 = 15

   15 x 15 x 15 = 3375mm³

Algebraically, the rule for the volume of the box is 3x³

 

Workbook p95:

a) 6 x 3 x 12 = 216mm³

b) 7 x 7 x 7 = 343mm³

c) 16 x 12 x 24 = 4608mm³

d) 15 x 8 x 4.5 = 540mm³

 

It has been lovely seeing your responses to Mr Browne's precept. Well done for keeping those standards high while you are working at home!   

 

It has been nice to hear positive feedback about beginning to learn about Buddhism. It sounds like you are interested in learning about another faith, including from parents who are learning about it too!

Maths for Monday 20th April

Guided practice:

1) This will depend on the size of the table and chair you have used from home.

2a) 3 x 2 x 1 = 6m³

  b) 1 x 1 x 1.5 = 1.5m³

  c) 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 = 0.125m³

 

Workbook pages:

1a) 3 x 4 x 6 = 72m³

  b) 5 x 5 x 5 = 125m³

  c) 0.8 x 5 x 3 = 12m³

  d) 15 x 4 x 2.5 = 150m³

2)

A = 3 x 10 x 24 = 720m³

B = 7.5 x 5 x 21 = 787.5m³

C = 25 x 5 x 6 = 750m³

D = 9 x 9 x 9 = 729m³

E = 7 x 7 x 16.2 = 793.8m³

F = 36 x 4 x 5 = 720m³

  1. E has the greatest volume.
  2. A and F have the smallest volume.

 

Challenge: Here is the solution from the Nrich website (where the challenge was from)

This problem is a tricky one.

Somebody said that they thought the best place to start was a little over half the length, height and width of the box, which seems very sensible.

A number of you who have tried it drew tables to show possible lengths, heights and widths of the cuboid with the volume for each. This also seems like a good idea. Don't forget that having some cubes to hand might also be very helpful, or if you're good at 3D drawing, you could sketch out the cuboid in the box to check whether another would fit.

 

Well done to Joe, Mark, Lucy and Alex from Hazel Grove High School, Stockport who said that the smallest cuboid they could find is 7cm by 7cm by 7cm. They wrote:

 

We used the method of "slightly larger than halves".

They really persevered with their solutions. Fantastic work.

There is an alternative solution which you may want to think about too. Have a look at the hints and let us know if you find anything out!

Maths for Friday 17th April

The answers for yesterday’s Maths:

Guided practice:

1) Approximately:

    a) 1000cm³

    b) 144cm³

 

2a) 5 x 3 x 6 = 90cm³

  b) 10 x 12 x 15 = 1800cm³

 

3) 12 ÷ 3 = 4

    4 x 4 x 4 = 64cm³

 

4) 10 x 15 x 20 = 3000cm³

    3000 – (6 x 6 x 6) =

    3000 – 216 = 2784cm³

 

Workbook pages:

1a) 6 x 9 x 12 = 648cm³     

  b) 6 x 6 x 6 = 216cm³     

  c) 9 x 9 x 9 = 729 cm³

  d) 13 x 11 x 8 = 1144cm³

 

  1. Each brick is 9 x 4 x 4 (because the side is square and if the length = 4 then the width must also = 4)

9 x 4 x 4 = 144cm³

It is great to see that you are keeping the high presentation standards in your home learning books. Well done Oliver - a great example for us all!

English

Austin took his writing using "show not tell" and used it to make a contrasting poem. I love his language choices. By having the 2 stanzas together, you really do see the contrast in emotion. Well done Austin!

Here is his poem: 

 

Darkness from loneliness engulfing souls swallowing them whole. Pitch black, no hope on your own, needing help every step of the way. Lost a fear of friendship betraying you in the neverending war of life. But no chance of survival without. Friends betraying all around you, only a few friends you can trust. What will happen next? Will I ever get out?

A rush of glory, love fills the air. Heart pounding, a big question. Caring words, compassion full of undying love. Love and affection, care and respect. Like an undying flame warming up your body. Hearts dancing in your head. Questions but what to say. Blood rushing fast around your head. Love can change everything!!! Love is the strongest power of all. You don't need superpowers because you've already got one.

Oliver used his English writing to think about what his first day at secondary school might be like. I hope you feel this excited on your first day back to school - whether this ends up being back at Chevening or going to secondary school!
PE - I have had some great HIIT routines emailed to me already. We will use some for PE but if you want to have a go they are available to download here.
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